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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Injury experience in coal mining found in the catalog.

Injury experience in coal mining

United States. Bureau of Mines

Injury experience in coal mining

by United States. Bureau of Mines

  • 379 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Epidemiology,
  • Statistics,
  • Coal Mining,
  • Coal mines and mining,
  • Periodicals,
  • Wounds and Injuries,
  • Coal mine accidents

  • Edition Notes

    StatementU.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
    Series1948-1950: Bureau of Mines bulletin, 1951-1970: Bureau of Mines information circular, 1971-1975: MESA informational report, 1976-198 : Informational report / U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, <1989->: Information report, Bulletin (United States. Bureau of Mines), Information circular (United States. Bureau of Mines), Informational report (United States. Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration), Informational report (United States. Mine Safety and Health Administration), Information report (United States. Mine Safety and Health Administration)
    ContributionsUnited States. Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, United States. Mine Safety and Health Administration
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTN295 .U58a subser.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25453239M
    LC Control Number52060589
    OCLC/WorldCa1096905

    Underground coal mining injury: A look at how age and experience relate to days lost from work following an injury Article in Safety Science 48(4) April with 86 Reads. In Western Kentucky, the one thing that most people have in common is a history of coal mining in their families. Michael Davis grew up hearing mining stories from his dad, two grandfathers, a great-grandfather, and an aunt -- with their combined years of mining experience/5(7).

    for assessing injury risks associated with ergonomics aspects of underground coal mining equipment. De-identified text describing all incidents reported by underground coal mines in NSW during the 3 years to J were obtained from Coal Services.   Coal mining. Coal mining had recordable injuries and illnesses per full-time workers, and a rate of cases with days away from work. More than 50 percent of days-away-from-work cases in coal mining required 31 or more days to recuperate. Metal ore mining. The injuries and illnesses in this industry sector required a median of 27 days.

    Injury experience at coal mines and mechanical-cleaning plants (excluding officeworkers) in was fatal nonfatal disabling work injuries during an exposure time of million man- . • Coal mining: per , full-time equivalent workers There were 28 fatal injuries in coal mining in , down from an average of 31 fatalities per year from to In , 20 fatalities (or 71 percent of all fatalities in coal mining) were in bituminous coal underground mining.


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Injury experience in coal mining by United States. Bureau of Mines Download PDF EPUB FB2

Injury experience in coal mining, Detailed analysis of factors influencing mine safety and related employment, production and productivity data (Bulletin / Bureau of Mines) [Seth T Reese] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Injury Experience in Coal Mining, Analysis of Mine Safety Factors, Related Employment, and Production Data [John C.; Wrenn, Virginia E.; Jones, Nina L.; Reed.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Moyer, Forrest Theodore, Injury experience in coal mining, [Washington]: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Machisak, John C. Injury experience in coal mining, Washington, D.C.: U.S.

Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Injury experience in coal mining, [Washington] U.S. Bureau of Mines [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Forrest Theodore Moyer; Mary B McNair.

Coal mine accidents, Coal mines and mining, Coal Mining, Wounds and Injuries Publisher Washington: U.S. G.P.O. Collection library_of_congress; americana Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress Contributor The Library of Congress Language EnglishPages: @article{osti_, title = {Injury experience in coal mining, }, author = {Reich, R.B.

and Hugler, E.C.}, abstractNote = {This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are.

occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, and occupation.

Related information on. occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Moyer, Forrest Theodore, Injury experience in coal mining, [Washington]: U.S. Bureau of Mines, []. INJURY EXPERIENCE IN COAL MINING, by Staff, Information Technology Center Directorate of Program Evaluation and Information Resources Denver, Colorado ABSTRACT This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for Bituminous coal underground mining employs slightly more than half of all coal mining industry workers, but experiences a higher share of occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities.

The rate of fatal injuries in the coal mining industry in was perfulltime equivalent workers, nearly six times the rate for all private. Coal has been mined in the United States since colonial times and coal mining has always been a dangerous occupation.

Despite the dangers involved in coal mining, coal is essential to the functioning of our society. Coal provides energy for products. All general measures of the safety record of the coal mining industry worsened appreciably in Injury experience for the year was fatal nonfatal injuries at respective frequency rates of and Per million man-hours of worktime.

From Introduction: "Data on the injury experience at coal mines in the United States in this bulletin are presented in two section sections. General and detailed data on the safety record at bituminous-coal, lignite, and Pennsylvania anthracite mines, separately an combined are included in the first section.

The second section contains certain historical injury statistics at all coal Author: Seth T. Reese, Virginia E.

Wrenn, Elizabeth J. Reid. days lost as well as total mining experience and days lost following an injury. Furthermore, the data indi- cated an increased risk of overexertion injuries as Cited by:   From Introduction: "The injury data and experience in this bulletin are presented in three general sections.

The first section contains general and detailed data relating to injury experience in bituminous-coal and Pennsylvania anthracite mines, separately and combined into totals for all coal mines. The second section of the report contains the generalized annual injury records of Author: Forrest T.

Moyer, G. Jones, V. Wrenn. @article{osti_, title = {Injury experience in coal mining, }, author = {}, abstractNote = {This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location.

The average severity was days lost or charged per injury. These statistics represent the injury experience of an average ofemployees per day, working an average of days in 5, coal mines for a total of million man-hours worked and a coal output of million tons.

From Introduction and Summary: "The Injury Data and experience at coal mines in the United States for are presented in this bulletin under the following general heads: (A) General injury experience: (B) Selected injury data (C) Injury experience by States: (D) Major disasters: (E) Historical coal-mine injury experience:"Author: Seth T.

Reese, Virginia E. Wrenn, Elizabeth J. Reid. These coal miners' wives, ranging in age from late teens to eighty-five, tell of a way of life dominated by coal mining―and shadowed by a constant fear of death or injury to a loved one.

From birth to old age, they experience the social and economic pressures of the coal mining by: This study used the Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) database on accidents, injury, and illness from the years through to examine how age, experience at the current mine, total years experience as a coal miner, and experience in the current job affects injury severity.Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities in the Coal Mining Industry Coal mining is a relatively dangerous industry.

Employees in coal mining are more likely to be killed or to incur a non-fatal injury or illness, and their injuries are more likely to be severe than workers in private industry as a whole, according to the Bureau of Labor Size: 74KB.